Three Activities You Must Do In Maui

‘The Valley Isle’ is the second biggest island in Hawaii, and is renowned for their world-famous beaches. Maui also allows you to experience the views of humpback whales and the sacred Lao Valley; it is no wonder that it has been named as the ‘Best Island in the U.S’ by travel magazine ‘Conde Nast Traveler’ readers for the last 20 years.

The 30 miles of beaches is a particular place to start and relax, but the activities around the area of why you will keep coming back to Maui. Here are three of the activities that you need to experience.

Molokini

This is the best place to start if you are looking to swim with all their unique sea creators located around the area. Furthermore, it is one of the three volcanic calderas in the world. It indeed is a once in a lifetime experience that you can only fulfil in Maui. It is located a mere few miles off the coast and was formed over 150 thousand years ago.

The moon shaped island begins from 300 feet under the ocean’s surface and peaks at 160 feet above the sea level; meaning that half of it is hidden by the sea, making for a jaw-dropping picture from the right angle. Due to the incredible underwater marine life, people come from all around the globe to experience the uniqueness that comes with Molokini. Fear not if you’re a novice as there are also a wide range of excursions for those that haven’t dived before. Snorkelling is also available, but the best way to experience this phenomenon is by diving deep under the surface.

Iao Valley State Park

Iao Valley State Park

Located in the centre of Maui you will enter the guard of lush valley floor at Iao Valley. This state park is a diligent 4,000-acre space and is home to the most instantly recognisable landmark in the whole of Hawaii according to a Vancouver bc moving company owner – avid travel ensuthiastisct. The Iao Needle stands at 1,200 feet. This green-mantled rock overlooks the Iao steam and has an array of easy hiking trails; as well as a perfect place for a photo.

Aside from the magnificent sculptures and tropical beauty, the state park is also steeped in historical significance. The Battle of Kepaniwai took place here in 1790. This conflict saw the clash of King Kamehameha I and the Maui Army. The King was attempting to unite the islands, something that he was able to achieve due to the Iao Valley’s lookout points. It is of fundamental importance that you learn of this when you visit as it changed the course of Hawaiian history forever.

The path towards the Iao Needle is easily accessed by everyone as there is a clear path from the parking area to the picturesque view. It would be important to remember that the best time to head up there is in the early morning as the view will be impeded by clouds later in the day. Families can venture into the rainforest and walk freely, while the interactive exhibits at the Hawaii Nature Center are also worthwhile.

Haleakalā National Park

If you’re on the lookout to see something extraordinary, then this is the national park for you. There is an extensive selection of birds and cultural experiences that can only be done at this part of Maui. Haleakalā is the place to experience the full Hawaiian culture as you feel the warmth on your back as you hike up the volcanic landscape to spend a few hours at the remote summit.

This isn’t for the faint-hearted as once you’re at the summit and Kipahulu District; there is nothing around except for nature. Furthermore, it could take approximately 45 minutes for an ambulance to arrive at the top of the 10,023-foot summit.

The most idyllic time of the day to go is for the sunrise. This needs to be booked up at least 40 days before you travel. It is an early start as the trip requires you to be present there between 3:00 am and 7:00 am, but it is well worth this unforgettable experience.…

Essential Travel Information When Heading To The French Polynesia Islands

Everybody has a destination in mind when they are organising their honeymoon, but the destinations found in the French Polynesia islands always rank near the top.

Sometimes nature draws together dreamy scenery and beautiful clear water, and that is precisely what you will find among these islands. That isn’t even mentioning the accommodation; this can only be defined as romantic.

The French Polynesia islands will always remain the dream vacation for couples, but over recent years it is becoming a typical holiday destination for families; so you’re never too old to visit.

Location

The 118 islands of French Polynesia can be found in the middle of the South Pacific; just over ten hours away from Toronto.

French Polynesia Islands

The beautiful islands are spread over two million square miles and divided into several groups. The largest of the islands is Tahiti, and here you will also find the capital city of Papeete. These are two of the most popular destinations that visitors come to; they are among the Society Islands. Moorea and Bora Bora also fall into this group.

Further adrift you will find the Tuamotu Islands; destinations here include Fakarava and Tikehau, and the Marquesas Islands. The two less commonly visited are the Austral and Gambier Islands.

When to Go?

The French Polynesia islands are the perfect destination with sunshine all year round. There are only two seasons; summer and winter. Although, the worst you can expect in the winter is showers. The best time to travel is during the clear and dry winter months between May and October. However, should you visit between November and April there is still constant sunshine, but there may be random showers.

Suggested Schedules

Due to the 15 islands hosting tourism infrastructure it can be confusing to decide where to start; mainly down to the 100’s of possible combinations you could do. It is mostly down to your travelling experience and the interests that you have.

People visiting these islands for the first time tend to start their seven or ten day trip at Tahiti and travel on a circuit of three islands. From Tahiti you can move onto Moorea which is a green and beautiful island; just a short ferry away from Papeete and the highly-regarding Bora Bora. The latter is the perfect destination, with the dazzling Mt. Otemanu and lagoons likely to be the highlights of your entire trip.

Bora Bora is the perfect location for second-time visitors and hopeless romantics. The scenery, weather and lifestyle never get old and is the definition of a dream vacation. Should you be a returning visitor to the islands, you can move on from here to Taha. This is located just a short flight away from the Bora Bora, and they boast rare pearl and vanilla farms. Snorkelling enthusiasts can move onto Tikehau, Manihi or a different secluded Tuamotu area to experience a once in a lifetime underwater experience. The dreamy beaches here will ensure that you can relax afterwards.

However, should you be interested in more diving you should head to the unique coral reefs located at Rangiroa; which is renowned as one of the best places in the world to dive. Those that are craving an adventure can enjoy exploring ancient tribal lore at the breathtaking Marquesas.

Are the islands expensive?

The majority of food and drink on the islands is expensive; since they have to be shipped in over a long distance. The cheaper options include fresh seafood and tropical fruit. Taha and Bora Bora are the most expensive islands, while Tahiti and Moorea can be up to a third cheaper. To save money, you can shop around and find a beach bungalow that includes breakfast.

French Polynesia Islands

Visa Information

Citizens of the USA and Canada can stay for 90 days or less with a valid passport. For safe travel tips and updates for Canadian citizens, be sure to check out this government site for up to date safety related informations.

Native Language

English is spoken fluently, but the two official languages are Tahitian and French. You will find that hotel staff will be able to speak English, as will shop workers and tour operators.

Currency

The official currency on the islands is the French Pacific Franc (XPF). You will be able to exchange all major currencies into XPF inside hotels as there are few cash machines.…

Curacao Island – Ultimate in Diversity

Curacao is a small land mass to be found 40 miles north from the sea coast of Venezuela located in the southern part of the Caribbean. It is a fraction of the ABC cluster of islands that include Aruba, Bonaire, and Curacao belonging to the Netherlands Antilles. Once you have visited the island, you will probably think about living there after experiencing its extremely soothing ambiance. Its beaches adorned with crystal clear waters and snow white sands are the most popular among travelers.

Curacao Historical Sites

The island boasts a decidedly European character to its design and community spaces against a Caribbean backdrop. The island’s Dutch origins are perhaps most obvious in the capital city of Willemstad, a favorite tourist destination for sightseeing and shopping. Willemstad is split into two parts, Otrobanda, and Punda, which are connected by the famed Queen Emma Bridge. Queen Emma Bridge was built in 1888, measuring 548 feet long across St. Anna Bay, and is one of the world’s most famous pontoon bridges – or “bridge of boats” – suggesting it is free standing and sustained by floating vessels.

Beach activities

The Caribbean waters in this area of the world are warm and very inviting for anybody that enjoys water sports, such as diving and snorkeling. Guest will come from all over the world to enjoy the island for this very purpose. The beach areas also offer some other impelling draws as well. Blue Bay and Playa Groot Kip are two of the island’s largest and most popular beaches. The Westport Beach is for those beachgoers looking for a more dynamic sunning landscape at the northeast of the island, known for the enormous cliffs that surround it, or Playa Kenepa which lies between two beautiful coves.

Sorghum Stalk House Museum

If you travel outside of Willemstad to the arid landscape of the island’s interior, you will most likely spot some plantation homes and Dutch windmills. Similar to many of the buildings in Willemstad, most of the plantations date to the 18th century. While several plantation homes and their surrounding buildings have been reduced to rubble, some of the estates have been maintained as museums. If you are interested in how these people lived during colonial times, tour the Sorghum Stalk House Museum.

National Parks

Usually, Curacao guides direct dune buggy groups on activities such as snorkeling trips in hidden coves, explorations of shoreline caves, and hikes through the interior mountains within its desert land of Christoffel National Park and the breathtaking coastal scenery of Shete Boka National Park. If hiking is not for you, consider trying horseback riding on the grounds. In some areas all through the park, kayaking is also accessible.

Although you certainly do have a lot of different options available to you as far as where you will vacation, Curacao Island is indeed one that should be kept at the top of the list. If you come to visit the island, it will provide you with vacation memories that will last for a lifetime.